by Danica Anderson PhD (Author), Erin Hilleary (Illustrator), Connie Simpson (Illustrator)

Hardcover

A visually and viscerally riveting hard cover, glossy table worthy compilation of art and stories from South Slavic women.  Discover how trauma erases the female-based community and culture. In the face of modern day territorial warfare, South Slavic women possess a powerful tool, yet often neglected, that has the potential to heal grief-stricken communities around the world.

This published works captures the women’s stories which represent more than the pale slips of paper found in interdisciplinary works of research. The narratives are undervalued in institutions, where many academic and medical experts consider these lived experiences on the front-lines to be nothing more than anecdotal first-person accounts of little offer to the empirical community.

Blood and Honey. The Secret Herstory of Women: South Slavic Women’s Experiences in a World of Modern Day Territorial Warfare is of interest to those studying history from the ground perspective of those who lived it, who wants to immerse into the vibrant reality that colors in the outline of dates of imperialist wars and the war bounty.

Proceeds go to the women war crimes and war survivors.

Reviews

“You do not read this book. You experience it. As you live this book, you find your emotions layered in contradiction to each other. The stories shared simmer in your memory, and only with time have I been able to process what I’ve read and the myriad of ways I feel about it. Dr. Anderson’s work with the survivors of the genocide that tore apart the former Yugoslavia was done at significant personal risk, and the courage she repeatedly shows in the course of her work with the survivors is quite moving. Individual stories of survival and life in the aftermath paint a complex picture of hope and strength, staggering loss and grief, and women helping to heal each other and change a society that can be hell-bent on endless cycles of revenge. This is not an easy book to live, but the journey is worth it.” – Angela Davison, JD